Endocrine System 2018-02-06T18:29:21+00:00

Neuroendocrine Tumours of the Endocrine Sytstem

Sites Where Endocrine System Tumours Can Occur

Endocrine System Tumours can include:

Associated Symptoms
Symptoms may be evident depending whether the tumour is functioning or non-functioning. Either type of tumour may cause a lump or a feeling of fullness in the abdomen as well pain in either the abdomen or back. Functioning tumours may cause symptoms related to the release of cortisol, aldosterone, testosterone or estrogen: weight gain, changes in hair growth, high blood pressure, excessive thirst and urination or menstrual irregularities in women. Patients with certain genetic syndromes are at an increased risk of developing ACCs.
Associated Symptoms
Neuroblastoma is a NET that often appears in early childhood, with symptoms that may include a lump in the neck, chest or abdomen, bulging eyes, bone pain, and weakness or paralysis. In infants, painless blue-coloured lumps can sometimes be seen under the skin, and a distended stomach and breathing difficulties may also be present. Less common symptoms include fever, easy bruising or bleeding, high blood pressure, severe diarrhea, uncontrolled muscle or eye movements, or swelling throughout the body.
Associated Symptoms
Symptoms include high blood pressure that does not respond to medication, headache, sweating, rapid or irregular heart rate, feeling shaky or extreme paleness.
Associated Symptoms
General symptoms may include high blood pressure, headache, rapid heart rate, sweating or flushing, an enlarged mass in the neck, dizziness, ringing in the ears or
vision problems. However, symptoms will vary widely depending on the location of the tumour, since only certain tumours secrete substances that give rise to symptoms.
Associated Symptoms
Symptoms will vary depending on the type of hormone or other substance that is secreted by the tumour cells (somatostatin, ACTH, thyroid, etc.). Additional, rare symptoms may include vision problems, or abnormal movement of the eye or eyelid, accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid around the brain or leakage via the nose.
Associated Symptoms
Symptoms may not be evident in the early stages of disease. However, as the tumour increases in size patients may experience cough, chest pain and symptoms related to compression of the superior vena cava, a large vein that leads into the heart. These symptoms might include facial swelling, headaches, visible veins in the face, neck or chest, or dizziness. In addition, thymic NETs are often associated with endocrine disorders that release hormones, which in turn, can cause other symptoms.
Associated Symptoms
Symptoms are generally related to increased levels of parathyroid hormone (PTH), resulting in a condition called hyperparathyroidism. Patients may experience vocal cord paralysis and a lump in the neck may be present. Other signs include high levels of PTH and calcium in the blood, along with kidney or bone disease that can result from elevated PTH.
Associated Symptoms
Symptoms may not be evident in the early stages of disease. At later stages, patients may experience difficulty breathing or swallowing, hoarseness and a lump in the neck may be present.

*  Although the majority of NETs are not hereditary, these types of NETs can be associated with inherited syndromes.

Resources for Endocrine System Tumours

Dr. Shereen Ezzat